Articles

Consecration of Canada - Photo Album

Bishop McGrattan consecrated the Diocese of Calgary to the Immaculate Heart of Mary on Saturday, July 1, 2017, with a celebration of Eucharist, Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament and Rosary prayers.

The Diocese of Calgary thanks all the liturgical ministers involved and the staff at St. Mary's Cathedral for their assistance. A special thank you for God Squad Canada for preparing the delicious barbeque for everyone!


Created with flickr slideshow.

 

If the slideshow does not play in your browser, please view directly in the Flickr Photo Album here.

Photography: Victor Panlilio

Related Offices Bishop's Office of Liturgy
Related Themes Canada 150 Eucharist Liturgy Prayers Diocesan Event Diocesan History Mary Diocesan Celebration

Celebrating the World Day of Migrants and Refugees

The Church has been celebrating World Day of Migrants and Refugees each year since 1914. World Refugee Day has been marked by the UN on June 20 since 2000.

This year, join us on June 29, the Feast of Saints Peter and Paul, for a special mass to celebrate World Day of Migrants. This is an opportunity for the faith community to reflect upon the role migration has played in our history and tradition, pray for migrants and refugees around the world, and raise awareness about the causes, challenges, and opportunities involved with migration.

Join Bishop William McGrattan on June 29, 7:00 p.m. at St. Mary’s Cathedral to celebrate World Day of Migrants and live the words of Pope Benedict: “The Church is God’s family on earth” [Deus Caritas Est].

Related Offices Social Justice Bishop's Office of Liturgy
Related Themes Social Justice Canada 150 Prayers Refugees

Consecration of Canada

As part of the celebrations marking the 150th anniversary of Confederation the Bishops of Canada will be consecrating our country to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

  1. Diocesan Prayer Service on July 1, 2017

  2. Bishop McGrattan will consecrate the Diocese of Calgary on 1 July, 2017. All are invited to St. Mary’s Cathedral at 10am for a service of Adoration, Scripture, rosary, and the consecration followed by a BBQ. The regular daily Mass at St. Mary’s remains at 9am followed by exposition of the Blessed Sacrament. Register here

    Download Poster Here

  3. Consecration Prayer.

  4. All parishes in the diocese are invited to pray the consecration prayer at the Vigil Mass on Saturday July 1st. Click here to download the prayer.

  5. Parish Celebration

    1. Parishes are also invited to hold a parish celebration on one or more Saturdays within the anniversary year (July 1 2017 – July 1 2018).
    2. Download Prayer Service Templates 
    3. Download Rosary Intentions Booklet
  6. Catechetical Materials.

    The CCCB has provided catechetical materials. Check out resources here.

Related Offices Bishop's Chancellor Office of Liturgy
Related Themes Canada 150 Prayers Diocesan Event Diocesan Celebration

Annual Outdoor Way of the Cross

The 34th Annual Outdoor Way of the Cross took place on Good Friday, April 14, 2017.

What is the Outdoor Way of the Cross About?

We come to walk along the inner city and stop at 14 Stations to listen to scripture readings, and to reflect on the suffering, passion and death of our Lord, Jesus Christ. The Annual Outdoor Way of the Cross is a two-and-a-half hour procession through the inner City of Calgary that starts and ends at St. Mary's Roman Catholic Cathedral on 18th Avenue and 2nd Street S.W.

As Jesus shared in our human suffering, and even death itself, so many of us come to walk with Jesus in his suffering and share his pain. We also see our own life hardships reflected in the burden of carrying the cross. We contemplate the great love that Jesus showed when he gave his life for all people in the world, so that they may have life.

The Way of the Cross is more than just a personal journey, Jesus' death is redemptive and in his dying we are reconciled with God, healed and redeemed. Through our participation in the walk, we ask that Jesus forgive our sins, heal our wounds, and transform us more into the image and likeness of God.

At the heart of the Outdoor Way of the Cross practice is also the idea and practice of Solidarity. We all share the common experience of seeing a loved one or someone close to us suffer. We wish that we could take on their burden. It is this idea of loving someone so much that we would like to take away his or her suffering by sharing in this person's experience. In the case of Jesus, God loved us so much that he allowed Jesus to share in humanly life and suffering, even in death, except for sin. As we participate in the Outdoor Way of the Cross, we are also in solidarity with our suffering brothers and sisters who are thirsting for compassion and justice in the world today.

To register as a volunteer or for more information about this year's Outdoor Way of the Cross, visit www.wayofthecross.ca

Related Offices Social Justice
Related Themes Pilgrimage Prayers Lent Diocesan Event

Learn by Heart: A Gift You Can Give Yourself

Memorization has fallen out of favour these days. In grade school I was required to learn some soliloquies from Shakespearean plays and then write them out in their entirety by memory. Today I cannot recall my own cell phone number but I could still make a fair attempt at reciting the Bard’s verse! I wonder if students are still asked to memorize anything today. Why bother, you might ask, with Google at your fingertips? Catholics have always been known for their recitation of rote prayers and the repetition of rituals. Our faith uses ritual language and gestures to affect us at a level deeper than our conscious thought. Yet, who has not at some time found themselves rattling off the words to a prayer while their mind is elsewhere? The response is not to stop memorizing but rather to consider and practice what it really means to learn something by heart.

To know something by heart means you have it memorized but it also implies that — in the way the heart animates the body by pumping blood — the text or gesture is inside of you, animating your every word, action, and thought. Think about the things that you know by heart: a recipe passed down through several generations, a loved one’s date of birth, your banking PIN. What you know by heart says something about your history, your relationships, and your priorities.


Part of our identity as Catholics includes knowing by heart the texts, gestures, and rituals that shape our belief and bind us to one another.


Most of us have memorized some traditional Catholic prayers like the Hail Mary and a blessing before meals. We also know the Lord’s Prayer and the ordinary parts of the Mass. Yet, when it comes to the Mass texts, we often know them only conditionally. It is easy enough to recite something surrounded by others reciting the same thing or when reading from a screen but if you try to recite the prayers alone, you might falter. Sometimes saying a prayer quickly can help the memory until you trip up and then have to go back to the beginning because you did not really know what you were saying anyway. Or perhaps you can sing the texts but if the melody is taken away, you become completely lost. These levels of memorization are admirable but their conditional nature challenges us to deepen our efforts by revisiting familiar texts, pondering their meaning, learning more about them, and inviting them to penetrate our hearts.

Making the effort to learn by heart is a gift you can give yourself. Once you have learned a prayer by heart, it becomes yours to pray at any time in any place. We do not always know in advance when we will need a prayer and so when the need arises, we may not have at hand a bible, a prayer booklet, and definitely not a projection screen with PowerPoint! With memory you can look into your heart for prayers to implore God’s help, receive consolation, to comfort others, to strengthen those whose faith may be wavering, or to draw together with others in prayer. If you are still looking it up on Google, it is not yet yours.

Part of our identity as Catholics includes knowing by heart the texts, gestures, and rituals that shape our belief and bind us to one another. During this season of Lent, consider learning by heart a new liturgical text. Strive not to only rattle off the words by memory but rather to savour the texts, learn what they mean, and pray the words so that, having learned them by heart, they can animate every word, action, and thought of your life.

Here are some suggested texts to learn by heart:

  • Apostles’ Creed and Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed
  • Gospel Canticles from the Liturgy of the Hours: Benedictus (Canticle of Luke), Magnificat (Canticle of Mary), Nunc Dimittis (Canticle of Simeon)
  • Psalms, especially 23, 34, 95, 141
  • Angelus and for Easter season, Regina caeli

You can find texts to memorize:

  • in most hymnals
  • in the Sunday or weekday missalette
  • on the Internet

Tips for memorization:

  • read the text over many times
  • read portions of the text and repeat it to yourself
  • repeat the text to others
  • practice writing down the text
  • test yourself on your recall of the text
  • use mnemonic devices like melodies or images
Related Offices Carillon Office of Liturgy
Related Themes Liturgy Prayers
Items 1 - 5 of 32  1234567Next

Article Filters

Associated Office:
Associated Program:
Associated Theme:

Looking for a Parish or Mass and Reconciliation Times?

Search the Parish Finder
Login