Articles

The Sweater

Let me confess that I am someone who tends to wear his clothes until they virtually fall apart. My favourite pair of shoes is over ten years old, and my sweaters weren’t much younger, with most pitted with an assortment of tears, holes and other character-defining features. In fact, it wasn’t until I had a business meeting and noticed one of the attendees fixated on my shredded sleeve that I decided, finally, to replace them.

My first thought for the fate of my trusty companions was a quick burial in the garbage. But as the mercury fell dramatically it occurred to me that perhaps a faded or well-worn sweater, for someone less fortunate, was better than none, and so I dropped them in the local charity bin. I won’t lie. My heart skipped a little at seeing my trusty steeds put out to pasture, but at least, I reasoned, it was a noble retirement.

As is often the way, I thought of those clothes going out into the community and wondered whose home they would join. Would they find their way to a cool retro-hunter keen to show off his thrift-shop chic? Would they be part of a workman’s casual wear, perfect for odd jobs around the house? Or would the charity determine that they weren’t fit for duty after all?

Recently, while volunteering at a soup kitchen, a remarkable situation occurred. As I was moving through the crowded hall I noticed an older gentleman shuffling forward. He set himself up at a crowded table and wriggled out of his threadbare jacket. To my surprise I saw that he was wearing one of my recently discarded sweaters. I recognized the torn sleeve, the holes peeking out beneath the armpits, and the frayed edges all around. I couldn’t help but move towards him, and when he saw me he smiled. “Check out my new threads,” he said, rubbing his sleeves happily. “Looking good,” I answered, humbled and abashed. “Yes,” he laughed emphatically, “yes I do.”

If there are such things as life-defining moments, then that was surely one of them. I will never again take my good fortune for granted, and I will always remember that all gifts matter, be they large or small. More importantly, I know that I must go out into the world to offer service. Not just to render good to others, but because my soul needs feeding, and there is no greater meal.

… because you have torn your clothes and wept before me, I also have heard you, says the Lord. -2 Kings 22.19

Related Offices Youth & Young Adult Carillon Religious Education
Related Themes Discipleship

Stewardship Resources

Spirituality of Stewardship: Lenten Mission

During Lent of 2017, the Office of Stewardship presented Spirituality of Stewardship, a three-day Lenten Mission in the Diocese with Fr. Daryl Befort from Wichita, Kansas. The Lenten Mission focused on a threefold Call of Discipleship: Deny Youreslf, Take up Your Cross, and Follow Christ.

The True Meaning of Being a Steward of Christ

Catholic speaker, author, and stewardship coach Tracy Earl Welliver explains how we do not merely volunteer for Christ when we serve Him in different parish ministries, but that we give our lives to Christ by serving in the Church because we truly love Him. This talk series is entitled "The True Meaning of Being a Steward of Christ", conducted in the Diocese of Calgary on September 2016.

Disciple's Response

This resource contains discussion questions that can be used in small group study. The document helps individuals grasp with the heart the meaning of stewardship. I recommend that parish councils and stewardship committees (also prayer groups in the parish) work through the text once a week for 5 weeks with a 6th week for making an action plan. The stewardship office has hard copies available for $10.

Deus caritas est (God is Love). Pope Benedict XVI's first encyclical.

The theology and principles in this resource are a wonderful formation tool for stewardship spirituality. Part one offers a speculative reflection on love. Part two is a reflection on the meaning of charitable giving. The Stewardship Office has hard copies available for $5.

Exploring Deus Caritas Est

Exploring Deus Caritas Est is a 4-part process for small groups. Written by Anthony Garascia and published by Ave Maria Press, the study guides are available as free downloads. They are also included here for easy access by your parish groups:

Stewardship: 'Well done, good and faithful servant.'

A Pastoral Letter by Thomas Collins, Archbishop of Edmonton

This document is shorter than Disciple's Response but still offers some discussion questions at the end. It is a very good resource and introduction to stewardship. The stewardship office has hard copies available for $0.50 a piece.

Stewardship and Teens

Cardinal Mahoney, Archbishop of Los Angeles

The Little Burgundy Book: Six Minute Reflections.

The diocese of Saginaw, Michigan has published three out of four of these books, one for each Gospel, based upon the writings of the late bishop, Ken Untener. So far, they have Mark, Luke, and John available. Those who have used these books find them invaluable and an easy but significant way of bringing stewardship into the prayer-life of busy people.

There are a few copies available in the diocesan stewardship office.

Pray Always and Never Lose Heart: A Treasury of Private Prayers for the Christian Steward

National Catholic Stewardship Council, Inc. 1998.

This collection of private prayers is available at the Resource Centre library.

Copies are available for purchase at the stewardship office ($15).

Stewardship: Disciples Respond. A Practical Guide for Pastoral Leaders.

Catholic Stewardship Council, Inc. 1997, 2004.

This book is filled with ideas for implementing stewardship practices in your parish.

It is available at the Resource Centre library. Copies for purchase are available at the stewardship office ($10).

Related Offices Stewardship
Related Themes Stewardship Discipleship Giving Resources Christian Life

World Day of the Sick 2017

Message of our Holy Father, Pope Francis for the 25th World Day of the Sick

Dear brothers and sisters,

On 11 February next, the Twenty-fifth World Day of the Sick will be celebrated throughout the Church and in a special way at Lourdes. The theme of this year's celebration is "Amazement at what God has accomplished: 'The Almighty has done great things for me...'" (Lk 1:49). Instituted by my predecessor Saint John Paul II in 1992, and first celebrated at Lourdes on 11 February 1993, this Day is an opportunity to reflect in particular on the needs of the sick and, more generally, of all those who suffer. It is also an occasion for those who generously assist the sick, beginning with family members, health workers and volunteers, to give thanks for their God-given vocation of accompanying our infirm brothers and sisters. Read more


Downloadable resources

Pope Francis' message (in French, click here)

download Prayer Cards

download Poster

Related Offices Health Care
Related Themes Bereavement Care Discipleship Pastoral Care Palliative Care Health Care Courses and Workshops Adult Formation

Mission Mexico

Dear Friends,

As we conclude this Jubilee Year of Mercy, I’m reminded of the words of Pope Francis at the beginning of his papacy: “Let us be renewed by God’s mercy and let us become agents of this mercy, channels through which God can make justice and peace flourish.” For the past seventeen years, the people of our diocese, through Mission Mexico, have been agents of God’s transforming mercy in the lives of many of the poorest of the poor in southern Mexico. As they have benefited from our corporal works of mercy, so we have benefited from their spiritual works of mercy on our behalf. The corporal works of mercy have borne fruit this past year in northern Mexico near Tijuana. The Trinitarian Sisters of that outreach have reciprocated in spiritual ways that have profoundly benefited members of our diocese. The Table of Mercy project was made possible by both your financial donations and time and labour of many Alberta volunteers.

As Bishop Henry has so well noted: “What an example of reciprocal mercy with which to conclude the Jubilee Year of Mercy!
Gratefully yours on behalf of Mexico’s poorest of the poor,

Fr. Fred Monk, Founder, Mission Mexico


Table of Mercy
John Paul, Table of Mercy Project Coordinator
St. Mary’s Parish, Cochrane, Alberta

“In April 2016, a group of us visited a monastery in Tecate, Mexico and met the Trinitarian Sisters of Mary. They had been praying for many years for God to send someone who could help them construct a soup kitchen/community meeting place at their convent/retreat centre. Thus began Mission Mexico’s Table of Mercy project. Many volunteers from our diocese have answered the call to come and build our special kitchen for the sisters. This beautiful, generous and loving group of nuns that minister to thousands of the poor and hungry each year, have demonstrated to all of us what it means to love as Christ loved us.

Each of us has brought home to Alberta a special gift in our hearts that we never expected.

If God calls you to assist in Mission Mexico projects, don’t be afraid to answer that call. His generosity knows no bounds and you will be given back more than you can fathom.”


Mike MacDonald
Mission Mexico Onsite Representative

“Here in the mountains, there are so many needs in so many different places, and Mission Mexico is a trusted partner in the struggle for life. It isn‘t that Mission Mexico can resolve all the problems of the poor, but it has a proven track record of accompanying the poor as they strive to build a world of greater justice for themselves and others. The people are so noble and the hopes are so tangible that it seems like the greatest blessing on earth to be allowed to journey with them.”

Related Offices Mission Council Carillon
Related Themes Social Justice Stewardship Discipleship Giving
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